madonna del piatto

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limoncello profiteroles

 

delicate limoncello profiteroles, a lovely summer dessert

delicate limoncello profiteroles, a lovely summer dessert

If you are under the opinion it might be difficult to make profiteroles, then just think you will be making very soft cookies.

Cookies are not intimidating aren’t they? Even the most inexperienced baker can make cookies. So. You can make profiteroles.

They are a breeze to whip up and you don’t necessarily need equipment such as a pastry bag or syringe. I usually shape my choux with the help of two teaspoons and when they are ready I split them open with a small serrated knife which I then use to fill them. It’s less messy and as beautiful.

I have developed this recipe as a way to use leftovers. After a few days of cooking classes, dinners with friends and my daughter’s birthday I found my fridge overflowing with all sorts of goodies. I had a bowl of chantilly, a jar of lemon curd and enough eggs for an army. I also was dying to try to make choux pastry with my gluten free cake mix. To my delight I found out that it works just as well as wheat flour.

Recipe

For the profiteroles:

  • 75g (2½oz) gluten-free cake mix or 00 wheat flour or pastry flour
  • 50 g (3.5 tabsp) butter
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) water
  • 2 medium eggs
  • grated zest of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • a pinch of salt

For the filling:

For the sauce:

  • 4 tablespoon lemon curd, bought or homemade, see recipe below
  • 2 teaspoon limoncello

Before you start, preheat the oven to 180°C/360°F/ and line a baking tray with parchment paper.

Lemon curd:

Put 2 whole eggs, zest and juice of 2 lemons, 170 gr (3/4 cup) sugar and 30 gr ( 2 tabspoon)  butter, cut into cubes, into a pan over low heat. Bring slowly to low boil. Remove from heat and strain immediately into a jam jar. Let it cool and close. Keep refrigerated.

Choux pastry:

Place the butter and water in a pan and melt over a gentle heat, then bring to the boil.

Remove from the heat and immediately stir in the flour, salt and sugar. Beat well, until the mixture forms a ball in the pan.

Allow to cool slightly, then gradually add one egg at the time, beating well after each addition. I actually transfer the ball of dough in the food processor, start the blades on high then add the eggs one at the time.

The dough needs to be a stiff dropping consistency. GF flour tends to absorb more liquid than wheat flour. As a consequence, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of eggs depending on the type of flour used. If using wheat flour, you might not need the whole second egg so whisk it and add it by the tablespoon.

Place small spoonfuls of the mixture  onto the baking sheet, about the size of a small walnut. Bake in a pre-heated oven for 15 – 20 minutes.

When the profiteroles are well risen and golden brown remove from the oven. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Assemble dessert:

Using a serrated knife, make a slit in the side of each profiterole, then fill with cream or custard. If you prefer, pierce a small hole in the bottom of the pastry and fill them using a pastry syringe.

To make the sauce, stir the limoncello into the lemon curd to obtain a smooth syrup.

Fill the profiteroles with whipped cream and arrange on a serving plate.  Any filling should not be added until the last possible moment because it will make the choux pastry soft. Just before serving, pour over the limoncello sauce.

Makes approx. 30 profiteroles. Serves 5-6

limoncello profiteroles1

gluten-free profiteroles, just as perfect as the “normal” ones

 

 

 

 

 


51 Comments

the limoncello factory leftovers

if life gives you lemons….

My mom has always produced industrial quantities of limoncello.  A set of tiny crystal tumblers and a lovely bohemian bottle full of the golden liqueur  was a permanent installation in her living room. She did not make it for herself, she hardly ever consumed alcoholic drinks, but proudly offered it to all guests at all times of the day. Ok almost, a guest was allowed a cup of espresso if it was earlier than 11:00 a.m.

Of course I also make it for my own guests. This is the right time of the year as  the best quality lemons, juicy and aromatic are available. It’s an end-of winter tradition: every year I zest, infuse and bottle. Then, I am left with lots of peeled lemons  I don’t know what to do with. They sit there, naked in the fridge and eventually they go to waste.

There is only so much lemon juice one can use in March  in rural Umbria. It’ is not really granita time, we’ve had snow 3 days ago. After several experiments however, I have created this naked lemons jam which is delicious on toast but also on vanilla ice cream, crostata and pannacotta

Recipe

  • Bring to the boil a pan of water large enough to hold all the lemons under water. Add 1 tablespoon salt per litre/quart
  • Drop the whole peeled lemons in the salted water and let them boil 15 min. This will remove the bitter taste from the pith
  • Strain and refresh under cold water.
  • [UPDATE] Another method to remove the bitter taste is to soak the lemons in water for three days like I do for oranges. However note that because the lemons have no peel, there is obviously no need to score it. This method is a bit more work than salt-boiling but the jam is a less sharp.
  • Place lemons over a cutting board and cut into small dice, pulp, pith and all. Discard seeds. Place a saucer in the freezer.
  • Transfer lemons and their juice in a tall pan, add equal weight of sugar and slowly bring to the boil stirring from time to time.
  • After about 30 min test for setting point. To do this, place 1/2 tsp jam on the cold saucer. If after half a minute a skin has formed, and it wrinkles, the jam is ready
  • Pour the boiling hot jam into warm, sterilized jars. Seal immediately with lids and place the jars upside down on a table until cold. You can actually eat it after a couple of days but it can be stored for a year.

…..make lemon jam


18 Comments

limoncello melon mousse

my very own light, fruity and good looking melon mousse

my very own light and fruity  melon mousse

This dessert is like a bite of summer and I am proud of it as it’s my personal creation. It’s a love story between a limoncello based fruit salad and a delicate panna cotta.

Recipe

Mousse:

  • g 150 (5 oz) cleaned cubed cantaloupe melon
  • 2 sheets gelatin
  • 70 gr. ( ¼ cup)  sugar
  • 150 ml ( 2/3 cup) whipping cream
  • ½ teasp vanilla extract

Garnish:

  • 1 slice of melon
  • juice of 1/4 lemon
  • 1 scant tabsp sugar
  • 2 tabsp limoncello

Soften gelatin in cold water for at least 15 min.  Meanwhile, blend the melon and sugar with a mixer, add the cream and transfer it into a pan. Bring the mixture to low boil, remove from heat.  Meanwhile take the gelatin from the water squeezing the sheets with your hand to get read of the liquid. Add the gelatin to the melon, whisk it well in, add the vanilla extract and let the mixture cool down.

Pour the mixture into 4 serving cups or ramekins and place them in the fridge for at least 3 hours.

Scoop out the rest of the melon with a melon baller and transfer it in a marinade of lemon juice, sugar and limoncello for at least 3 hours.
Serve the melon mousse prettily topped with the marinated fresh melon.

Serves 2

NB. Four sheets of gelatin are equivalent to one American or Canadian package of powder gelatin. One envelope should solidify 1 cup liquid. As explained for the panna cotta, try to experiment with the amount of gelatin to obtain a soft set pudding. If using powder gelatin, soften it not in water but in a small amount of the cream as indicated on packaged instructions. When softened, add it to the warm melon mixture.

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