madonna del piatto

Italian family cooking

ragu’

6 Comments

In net contrast to everything stated yesterday about sauce and Italians eating light meals, today we polished up a whole  pan of  glorious cannelloni al ragù. It was not a holiday, but we innkeepers must work throughout most of the occasions when others celebrate holidays. As a consequence we have to nominate a grey, cold and boring winter day as “special”and cook something worth a Christmas party.

To prepare good lasagne, cannelloni or a heart lifting plate of tagliatelle, one needs a good ragù.  NOT like that one in this picture please. More like in the picture below.

homemade egg fettuccine,perfect with a slow cooked pork ragu

homemade egg pappardelle, perfect with a slow cooked pork ragù

Then one needs time, good meat, good tomatoes, good EVO oil. I use finely minced pork neck, but beef or a mixture of meats is fine. My ragù is Southern in style so it has relatively more tomato than meat. I use little EVO oil for cooking but I drizzle a bit on the ready dish so the oil enhances the flavor of the sauce. I make a huge pot and freeze it in batches, it keeps perfectly.

Recipe

  • 2.1 kg bottled tomato puree equivalent to 5 14-ounce cans Italian plum tomatoes roughly chopped
  • 300 gr./ 10 ounces ground pork meat
  • 1 large onion
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 clove
  • 1/2 cup white wine

Soften the onion in 3 tablespoon olive oil over low heat. Use a covered, low, heavy bottom pan. When the onion is translucent but not caramelized, increase the heat and add the minced meat stirring quickly until light brown. Deglaze with the wine. Add the tomatoes with their juices, the bay leaf, the clove and cover again. Cook over the lowest possible heat for at least 1 and ½ hours, but up to three hours is desirable. Season with salt and black pepper.

Serve ragù with pasta or other starchy foods that have a rough surface, so the sauce does not slip away from it. Therefore, besides lasagne and cannelloni, use with ravioli, egg noodles of all sizes, gnocchi, polenta. Preferably do not use with spaghetti, penne and other smooth pasta.

Makes 2.5 liter (2.6 quart)

Fettuccine Al Ragu on Foodista

Author: madonnadelpiatto

Former scientist, I now run B&B and cooking school Alla Madonna del Piatto in Assisi, Umbria, central Italy, together with my husband Ruurd, daughter Tea and truffle dog Google. We love good food and wine, travel, beautiful handicrafts like textiles and pottery. We feel fortunate to be able to share our magical mountain with many friends from all over the world.

6 thoughts on “ragu’

  1. Pingback: lasagne « madonna del piatto

  2. Pingback: “priest chokers” made with farro flour | madonna del piatto

  3. I shall be trying your ragu’ recipe soon, it’s seems exactly as the ones my family in Italy make where just a few ingredients are used to achieve an ambrosial end product. Grazie per la ricetta!

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  4. Prego Gianni, we Italians have the ragu in our blood, isn’t it? Enjoy it!

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  5. Pingback: baked cardoons | madonna del piatto

  6. Stumbled across your blog. I have made this ragu twice in the past two weeks it is so good!

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